Just my thoughts....
To Plug, Or Not To Plug.........
Published on October 7, 2013 By RedneckDude In Mobile Tech

Anyone own a tablet?

 

I have a question.

 

Since most electronics today have lithium batteries, is it ok to leave a tablet plugged into the charger like you would a laptop?

 

Yrag once told me it was fine to leave my laptop plugged into the wall as much as I want.

 

I never unplug mine unless travelling.

 

Is the same ok for tablets?


Comments (Page 3)
on Oct 09, 2013


It was a tad snark, xinh2, but the Tesla going toast was blamed on it running over something in the road, something metal allegedly.

flagyl -

The company in Phoenix which was to install and service charging stations for EV's went belly up last week.  At least in a place as spread out as greater Phoenix (some of my regular sojourns are 80-100 miles round trip without ever 'leaving town'), all-electric vehicles are almost all second vehicles.  Not that that's a bad thing.

 

Yes...the infrastructure for electric cars would alleviate many of the concerns of owning one (after the cost of batteries comes down, of course). My other concern is recharging. You can fill your tank in ~5  minutes...I don't know how long it takes for rapid chargers to re-energize a battery, but I doubt it is five minutes.

 

That said, I am glad that someone is thinking about such things. It is a great idea. Hopefully the next company to try will be able to succeed.

on Oct 09, 2013

Daiwa, if you read my reply above to Jafo you'll see more explanation about the accident. Not only did the Tesla run over something, that something was a curved piece of metal that acted as a lever with so much force it was able to penetrate a 1/4 inch thick steel barrier that encases the battery pack. Imagine the same item penetrating a gas tank!

Charging infrastructure is an issue for electric vehicles. More for "city cars" like the Leaf than the 250+ mile range Model S, however. Our Tesla is our primary vehicle. We've gone on multi-day road trips using the Tesla supercharger network (free!) and I drive 60-90 miles a day commuting.

Flagyl, our Model S with a 250+ mile range will charge in about 10 hours from empty to full at our home (using a 220 volt 50 amp circuit.) At the Tesla superchargers it takes less than an hour to go from empty to 80% charge. On our road trip we stopped at the Supercharger, plugged in, grabbed some lunch and when we were done we unplugged and drove on with a full "tank" of electrons. The infrastructure isn't all there yet, but then at the turn of the 20th century there was a lot LESS infrastructure for gas vehicles than there is today for electric. After all, the entire country is already electrified.

Anyway, I am sounding a bit like a zealot and I really am not. Everyone has different needs in vehicles, different wants, and different expectations. I personally could not stand driving an SUV but lots of people love them. To each their own!

 

on Oct 09, 2013

Opinions On Charging.....

If you ask me, I'd say only buy what you can afford to pay cash for. Those interest rates are murder!

on Oct 09, 2013

Funny guy....

 

on Oct 09, 2013

How about all those who didn't want the Tesla to succeed. Texas comes to mind as they want to ban it from their state. I wonder why.

on Oct 09, 2013

How about all those who didn't want the Tesla to succeed. Texas comes to mind as they want to ban it from their state. I wonder why.

And people wonder why Detroit is bankrupt....

on Oct 09, 2013

Charging infrastructure is an issue for electric vehicles. More for "city cars" like the Leaf than the 250+ mile range Model S, however. Our Tesla is our primary vehicle. We've gone on multi-day road trips using the Tesla supercharger network (free!) and I drive 60-90 miles a day commuting.

I must confess to a certain degree of jealousy here.  But even if I could afford one, I doubt it's net carbon footprint is less than that of an ICE vehicle, given current means of generating electricity.  Those superchargers may be 'free!' to you the owner, but they are getting paid for by somebody.  Is it a deal like 'first 2 years of OnStar free with purchase' or some other arrangement?  I'm getting at whether as a taxpayer I'm entitled to come over and borrow the T occasionally since I'm footin' some of the charging bill.

 

On a side note, haven't read up on it enough to know where things stand, but is a 'Yucca Mountain' sort of dilemma going to face us if/when we're mostly EV's & having to dispose of all those batteries?

on Oct 09, 2013

Daiwa, that is a very good question. The answer is that Tesla pays for the electricity at supercharging stations for the life of the Model S. However, you must have purchased the supercharging capability in your car (standard in all 85 kwh Model S like mine, optional on 60 kwh versions.) So, essentially you are paying a fixed amount up front to be able to use the superchargers as much as you want, whenever you want for the life of the car. Not for as long as you own it now, for the life of the car. Subsequent owners could you use them too. As a taxpayer you aren't paying a thing for this. Now, I could lose out on my free long trip refueling if Tesla went bankrupt, but I am willing to risk it And if you are ever in my neck of the woods (Wine Country California) I'd be happy to give you a ride in our Tesla as a taxpayer bonus. You are making out like a bandit!

There are a lot of misconceptions about carbon footprint as it relates to electric cars. The reality is they can be either "a bit better" than a traditional car over their lifetime to unbelievably better over their lifetime depending on how the electricity you use gets generated as you suggest.

Consider that the Model S is rated at 89 mpge. That means if you look at energy is used to generate the electricity and how much electricity the car uses, it nets out to about the same as a car that gets 89 mpg. Already that's pretty amazing considering this is a a BIG, fast sports sedan, not an econobox!

So even if you are using dirty power generation it is fairly clean compared to most gas or diesel cars. How much cleaner depends on where you live. The worst area in the US is West Virginia (they burn coal for all their power more or less) and the best in the US is, I think, New Hampshire (mostly nuclear power there.) Then again, if like our family you have solar installed to more than take care of the yearly electric use of the vehicle the net operating carbon footprint is zero! Hard to beat that from a CO2 standpoint.

As to disposal... probably not an issue there. The battery packs can be re-purposed for grid storage once the car is no longer viable and Lithium ion cells can be recycled.

on Oct 10, 2013

Glad the battery issue is moot.

May I ask what they charge for that unlimited electricity usage?

One would obviously pay for the electricity used to charge it overnight at one's home (ignore the solar array - most of us are not net power producers).  Do you have the car on a separate meter to track its electricity consumption?

Hard for me to get my arms around the notion of the car getting the equivalent of ~90mpg.

on Oct 10, 2013


Glad the battery issue is moot.

May I ask what they charge for that unlimited electricity usage?

One would obviously pay for the electricity used to charge it overnight at one's home (ignore the solar array - most of us are not net power producers).  Do you have the car on a separate meter to track its electricity consumption?

Hard for me to get my arms around the notion of the car getting the equivalent of ~90mpg.

The option on the 60 kwh cars is $2000.

We don't have a separate meter, but the car reports energy used over time on a trip meter. Our car has averaged 315 wh/mile over 7000+ miles since we got it. There are some losses when charging of around 10% so call it 350 wh/mile driven. That's nearly 3 miles per kwh. The average electric rate for a kwh of electricity in the US is $0.12 if I remember right. So around $0.04 per mile or about a third that of a 30 mpg car at $4.00 per gallon! Even at extreme tiered rates like we have in California (where if you use a lot of electricity they hammer you for $0.32 per kwh above a certain usage) the cost per mile is $0.14 or only slightly more than a 30 mpg car.

The reason is just in how efficient an electric motor is compared to internal combustion. You don't waste all that energy in making heat for starters. And the regenerative braking really adds to the efficiency as well.

on Oct 10, 2013

Anyone own a tablet?

I own several.

I do not charge any of them. They charge me!

Blood Pressure

Cholesterol

Blood Thinning

Gastric Reflux

Triglycerides

Neuropathic Pain

Sorry RND. I could not resist.

 

Cheers

 

Macca

 

on Oct 10, 2013

Illauna
There is a limit on how many times you can charge it. Ideally you want to fully discharge the battery (let your device die or 1%) then fully charge it for maximum battery life. Also not tablet related but Apple had reports of some of their iPhones 6s fatally electrocuting people...

iPhone 6?

on Oct 10, 2013

Aussie007

Anyone own a tablet?

I own several.

I do not charge any of them. They charge me!

Blood Pressure

Cholesterol

Blood Thinning

Gastric Reflux

Triglycerides

Neuropathic Pain

Sorry RND. I could not resist.

 

Cheers

 

Macca

 

 

You don't own those, you just rent them.